URBANSIDER our recommendations

Where To Watch the Tour de France in Paris

See the Cycling Competition in the City

The annual men's bicycle race is back for its 106th edition. July 6-27, the peloton will peddle through the French countryside, before crossing the finish line here in Paris July 28.

The 2019 edition of the Tour de France gets underway July 6th with riders setting off from Brussels, Belgium, then passing through 31 different cities in France before finishing on Paris’s Champs-Elysées July 28th.

Although only the final stage of the competition takes place in Paris this year, you can still follow along with all 21 étapes of the Tour de France while in the capital. Here are our suggestions for how to watch the race in Paris.

Follow from a Café or Pub

During what is undoubtedly the international cycling event of the year, many bars in Paris show all stages of the race, including a few classic Parisian cafés. We’ve double-checked for you and know that the friendly La Taverne de l’Olympia near Opéra and Le Viaduc Café under the arches in the 12th Arrondissement will both be happy to put on the Tour de France for you if you ask.

If you’re after more of a sports bar atmosphere though, your best bet is to head to an Australian or English pub in Paris. At the Café Oz Rooftop near the Gare d’Austerlitz you can watch some cycling on the Seine, sit at the counter of the cozy Cross of Saint George to talk cycling with an English-speaking local, or head to The Long Hop in the Latin Quarter where you can sit on the terrace and pop in to keep track of the peloton.

La Taverne de l’Olympia, 25 Rue de Caumartin, 75009 Paris
Le Viaduc Café, 43 Avenue Daumesnil, 75012 Paris
Café Oz Rooftop, 34 Quai d’Austerlitz, 75013 Paris
Cross of Saint George, 35 Rue Saint-Georges, 75009 Paris
The Long Hop, 25 Rue Frédéric Sauton, 75005 Paris

Cheer on the Cyclists During the Final Stage

The 21st and final stage of the 2019 Tour de France will come through Paris on Sunday, July 28. The first cyclists should arrive in the French capital just before 8pm, following along the southern border of the city before making their way up through the 14th Arrondissement, to the Quartier Latin and crossing the Seine before arriving at the Louvre at 20:08.

The riders will then make eight laps of the final circuit, going up the Rue Rivoli, through the Place de la Concorde, onto the Champs-Elysées, around the Arc de Triomphe, back down, and then around the Jardin des Tuileries before doing it all again.

Come early and get a spot on the Rue Rivoli across from the Jardin des Tuileries – there are fewer crowds than on the Champs-Elysées, you’ll be closer to the action, and you’ll get to see the cyclists pass by eight times!

Meet Them at the Finish Line

As every year since 1975, the finish line of the Tour de France is once again on the Champs-Elysées.

The first riders should be arriving at the final circuit at approximately 20:09, with the winner expected to cross the finish line at roughly 21:10. The sidewalks of the world-famous avenue can get very crowded during the event, and the barriers are often quite far from the actual athletes, so you may want to head to the Rue Rivoli instead if you don’t mind missing the actual finish.

Right after the race, however, the Champs-Elysées tends to clear out, meaning you can generally get a good spot if you’d like to watch the trophy ceremony.

Urbansider Tip: The Champs-Elysées while in Paris at the end of July, note that the famous Parisian avenue will be closed from 9am-11pm on July 28th for the event. Metro stations around the city may also be temporarily closed for the event, so check the RATP app to see which lines and stops are affected.


Subscribe to our newsletter for more Paris news & local tips


Subscribe


Share your personal Parisian story with the Urbansider community


Share


Make your trip easy & authentic / Book a Parisian experience


Experiment


Take a piece of Paris with you / Shop our boutique


Shop

© urbansider 2019
website by mobyclic

Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau

PROUD MEMBER OF THE PARIS CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU